Author Topic: How to calibrate a tps sensor?  (Read 1883 times)

SuperchargedAE92

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How to calibrate a tps sensor?
« on: July 15, 2013, 02:22:26 PM »
How do I calibrate a tps sensor using a volt meter? This is the only issue I have to make the car run, I also need to know what it needs to be at? If someone has experience doing this I would really like for you to come over an help me with it either today or tomorrow. I need to get my car running so I can get a job so I can start making my car look better...

twincharger

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Re: How to calibrate a tps sensor?
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2013, 08:56:58 PM »
How do I calibrate a tps sensor using a volt meter? This is the only issue I have to make the car run,

The TPS sensor will not cause the car not to run.

The TPS contains a switch that closes (conducts) when the throttle is closed.

It tells the ECU that the throttle is closed, so the ECU will use a slower algorithm to adjust the air/fuel mixture when the car is at idle compared to driving.

It also lets the computer turn the fuel injectors off when the throttle is closed and RPM is high (coasting).

It tells the ECU how fast the throttle is opening for a simulated accellerator pump.

Lastly, it allows the computer to sense when throttle is open greater than 75%, the computer will then richen the fuel mixture and retard timing a few degrees for more power. (high load)

Use an ohm meter between the outside 2 pins, adjust the TPS so that it reads near 0 ohms when the throttle is closed, and reads high resistance when the throttle is open.

That's all.

SuperchargedAE92

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Re: How to calibrate a tps sensor?
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2013, 11:37:16 PM »
My brother only has a volt meter so how do I do this?

twincharger

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Re: How to calibrate a tps sensor?
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2013, 11:51:28 PM »
Turn the knob to this symbol...



I'm not trying to be a dick, I just can't find a Greek Omega on my keyboard...

It shows 0 (or very close) when the meter leads touch together, and a very high number when they don't touch.

Even better is if it has a 'diode check' mode.  No symbol for a diode on this keyboard either.

Then it will beep for continuity when the meter leads touch.  You won't even have to look at the meter to set the TPS.

Make sure the switch between pins 1 and 4, the two outside pins on the TPS if I remember right have continuity when the throttle is closed, and high resistance when the throttle is opened even a little. 

It is not critical, the car just runs a little better when the TPS works.


SuperchargedAE92

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Re: How to calibrate a tps sensor?
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2013, 04:30:41 PM »
Thanks for the info! Come to find out it was my charge pipe that connects to my intercooler was disconnected because someone tryed to steal it, the clamp was all the way unscrewed. But hooked it back up and the car runs fine a little rough but runs good!  :)

eightsix

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Re: How to calibrate a tps sensor?
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2013, 02:01:46 PM »
I struggled with my tps for a long while and heard/read many opinions of what worked for others, as well searched for manuals etc etc... After I had twincharger solve my timing mystery... (TY AGAIN! lol) I got back to tuning this and the best approach I found was the diagnostic way of testing things in the 4age diag manual. I made myself a little key and it's not steered me wrong. (attached pic)

Get the car up to operating temp. Then when you're trying to get it to infinity out with the largest feeler gauge to start the process, go super super slow to find it. then finish the process and usually everything will be in spec.

If it's idling too high, check your timing and/or the idle adjustment screw on the TB. If you have a cut in your power band when the car is cool, you may want to try the long drawn out ways of tuning it or maybe replacing the tps altogether.

Also, I highly recommend converting the screws to an allen key. It costs about a buck and saves you a lot of time/frustration.

Good luck man